Review: Liverpool Biennial 2016: Assemble/Granby Workshops

As well as venturing to Granby Four Streets to witness the history and transformation for yourself, Granby Workshop will be displaying a showcase of their work outside the Exhibition Centre Liverpool in a new commission.

Sinead Nunes on Jose Angel Vincench’s ‘Exile’

At last the Biennial is upon us, and what better way to start seeing it than through the vast collection of public realm installations...

Review: Utopia Deferred at Corke Gallery

Utopia Deferred Corke Gallery, until 9th September 2016 Words, Julia Johnson, Messy Lines Look at any great human civilization and you can’t help but notice that people...

Review: Krzysztof Wodiczko at FACT for Liverpool Biennial 2016

Krzysztof Wodiczko: How can technology, specifically prosthetic technology, help our modern understanding immigration and displacement?

Review: It Will Never Work: 25 Years of Urban Splash

It Will Never Work: 25 Years of Urban Splash at RIBA North, until 16th June 2018 Words, Patrick Kirk-Smith “It would never have worked without all Urban Splash...

Preview: Milapfest, Ragafest for Sgt Pepper

Milapfest, Ragafest for Sgt Pepper St George’s Hall, Sun 11th June 2017 Words, Patrick Kirk-Smith On Sunday (11th June 2017) Milapfest, the UKs leading Indian Arts organisation,...

Review: Keith Piper, Unearthing the Banker’s Bones

Keith Piper, Unearthing the Banker’s Bones Bluecoat, Until Sunday 22 January 2017 Words, Kerry Milton On a night when the Liverpool arts scene was buzzing to breaking...

Review: Thatcher May Trump Farage, Lord & Slater

Threshold Festival 2017 debuted a new live art work by Lord & Slater entitled Thatcher May Trump Farage.

Review: Crafted at Kirkby & Huyton Gallery

Crafted captures the expanse of contemporary art practice, appealing to a variety of audiences from the art enthusiast to the ceramic hoarder. And with a range of prices, art has never been so affordable, or so functional.
Di-Andre C. Davies, Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner V2, courtesy the artist

Review: Di-Andre Caprice Davies and Leasho Johnson, Jamaican Pulse at Bluecoat

When it comes to Jamaican visual art, our understanding is more limited. Most of what we are familiar with as Jamaican visual culture comes from album covers or postcards. Why don’t we know about what’s going on in the studios, or on the streets?

Review: Foodsketz, Relay

Foodsketz, Relay Words, Jessica Fenna Foodsketz describe themselves as a ‘collaborative vehicle for food, art and discussion,’ they comprise of Alison Claire and Cat Smith. Starting...

Review: The Wonder of it All, Josie Jenkins & Jacqui Chapman

The Wonder of it All, Josie Jenkins & Jacqui Chapman The Gallery Liverpool, 29th September - 8th October 2016 Words & Pictures, Patrick Kirk-Smith If ever there...

Review: Culture Shifts: Global, at Open Eye, Look/17

Culture Shifts: Global, at Open Eye, Look/17 until 18th June 2017 (LOOK/17 continues until 14th May all over Liverpool) Words, Patrick Kirk-Smith Hong Kong and Liverpool have long...

Threshold: The Sublime Skin | Tabitha Moses Reviewed by Christof Häberle

Liverpool based artist Tabitha Moses’ new exhibition explores skin, and particularly the ‘relationship between the mind and the world’ and will be, as curator...

Review: Liverpool Print Fair 2017

Liverpool Print Fair 2017 Bluecoat, 8th April 2017 Words, Leyla Gurr Digital technology within the arts has taken leaps and bounds in recent decades, providing the market...
Liverpool Artists Network meeting, photo by Tony Knox

Review: Liverpool Artists Network

Liverpool Artists Network is an engine for action on behalf of the artists. It’s a celebration of the talent that already exists, and a proactive attempt to give that talent more of a voice for themselves.

Shelagh Cullity Interviews Wirral Couse Leader Vinny Lavell on this Years Fine Art Degree...

On a rainy Friday afternoon in the charming foyer of the Williamson Gallery in Birkenhead I met with Vinny Lavell, Course Leader for the...

Review: The Williamson Open, 2019

The Williamson Open has been happening in more or less the same format for over 90 years, but this was my first time so...
The Magic Band

The Magic Band play the music of Captain Beefheart, at The Kazimier

With the ever-changing time signatures of prog, and the vocals echoing those of the Captain himself, the band power on through guitar riffs and drum beats.

Review: Rituals, at Bluecoat Display Centre

Review: Rituals Bluecoat Display Centre, until 20th April Words, Charlotte Hill Bluecoat Display Centre is a base not only for artists but also collectives, small organisations and...

Review: The Pier Head – Tom Wood

The Pier Head - Tom Wood Open Eye Gallery, until 25th March 2018 Words, Carol Emmas I recently rewatched the BBC4 ‘What Artists Do All Day’ documentary...

Review: Threshold Exhibition at Baltic Social

The three artists behind this are the brilliant Steve Threlfall, Tristan Brady-Jacobs and Keith Webber, working together as Forgotten Art Collective, with a little help from Tony Reilly (aka. Ian Danger). A collective they have formed to celebrate and play with their work, but also to enlighten and enliven your day.
Michael Portnoy, Relational Stalinism: The Musical, 2016. 9 July 2016 at the Black-E, as part of Liverpool Biennial 2016. Photo: Rob Battersby

Reviews: Liverpool Biennial: Michael Portnoy, Relational Stalinism – The Musical

Think David Lynch meets the Coen Brothers and sprinkle a little weary pessimism on top and you will get the flavour of this unflinching collection of performances.

Rarely heard voices; how the women of St Helens provoked a performance that defined...

Review: TORCH, by ANU Productions Nervously fidgeting with a box of ink in my pocket for an hour spent in a terraced house in St...

Open Eye Gallery: Liverpool Biennial, by Kayleigh Davies

The first clue that the Open Eye Gallery was going to be different under the influence of the Biennial was obvious by the new,...

Edgelands: Emilie Taylor at the Williamson

The funny thing about Edgelands is that when you’re in them, you don’t really notice. Emilie Taylor’s experience is more reflective than my own, but...

Review: Contemporary Construction at Bluecoat Display Centre

Bringing an essence of architectural design into our interiors are the Bluecoat Display Centre’s latest exhibitors

Patrick M Higgins: Another Look at Domino Gallery by Sinead Nunes

Landscape Photographer, and his exhibition entitled Another Look, presented at one of Liverpool's foremost independent galleries, Domino, focused on architecture and explored new ways of seeing...

Review: Eimear Kavanagh’s experimental workshops at Bluecoat

Did it conquer my fear? It certainly loosened me up enough to lose some of the irrational artistic control I’ve developed

Review: Inspired by Alice, The Atkinson

Inspired by Alice Gallery 3, The Atkinson, Southport, until 7th September 2019 Words, Samantha Browne  A pair of closed curtains mark the entrance to the Inspired by...

Review: Suzanne Treister HFT: The Gardener – Liverpool Biennial 2016

Software plays an increasing role in our lives, but the line between lived reality and that presented to us by lines of code is increasingly difficult to define.

Review: Liverpool Open 2016 at Editions Ltd

The mass of fresh talent on display helps to define how the arts in Liverpool are changing, with critically engaged work, and a sea of comical notions hung up, side by side. It’s a show that covers all bases, and allows anybody to come and visit a massive overview of the emerging and established talent of Liverpool, all in one room. And that’s quite special.

Review: Fearless Creatures, The Gallery

Review: Fearless Creatures The Gallery, until July 7th Words, Julia Johnson (Messy Lines) Club kids, whether in photos, films or occasionally on the streets of London’s Soho,...

Soft Estate, at The Bluecoat

Review by Rachel Tillett Soft Estate is an exhibition of works from Edward Chell, as well as invited artists including Tim Bowditch, Nick Rochowski, Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau, Day...

Review: basement present, ‘basements connected’

Take any basement, they’re never simple things, with rooms to the left or the right, and supporting walls you never knew your house even needed. It’s hardly a layout a curator would ordinarily jump at, but its success is in its flaws, allowing artists with little in common to exhibit with each other

Why #writecritical?

Words by Sue Flowers Much has been written about the visual arts over the last few centuries, maybe as a way of defining it, by attempting...

Kayleigh Davies visits Sabelo Mlangeni’s exhibition at The Tea Factory

Sabelo Mlangeni focuses on the idea of 'the outsider', thoroughly executing emotion and perspective. The simplicity of the location (Tea Factory, Wood Street) as...

Review: The Liverpool Collection, at dot-art

The Liverpool Collection dot-art Gallery, until 13th January 2018 Words, Kevin Symes Hidden away in a charming Diagon Alley-esque side street is dot-art Gallery, who have just opened...

Review: No Such Thing As Gravity, FACT

No Such Thing As Gravity 10th November 2016 – 5th February 2017, FACT. Words & Images, Julia Johnson, Messy Lines For all that they are usually pigeonholed...
Baltic Clay, Scouse in a Bowl, © Andrew Sherriff Photo

Review: Scouse in a bowl – is good for the soul

Scouse in a bowl – is good for the soul Baltic Clay, at Fruit + Fibres, 24th February 2017 Words, Patrick Kirk-Smith Pictures, Andrew John Sherriff It’s not every...