The Reader Galley: Depictions of Land and Sea

unnamed5 – 11 September 2014

10am – 5pm daily

Free

“Before we take to the sea, we walk on land… before we create, we must understand”, Ernest Hemingway.

dot-art presents the work of two very different but complementary artists, at their first exhibition at The Reader Organisation’s new gallery space in Calderstones Park, South Liverpool. The juxtaposition of the landscape paintings of Carol Miller and the seascape linocuts of Jackie Wagg aims to provide the viewer with a range of interpretations of the natural world.

Jackie Wagg graduated in 1984 with a First Class Honours Degree in Fine Art. She has exhibited in group exhibitions in the UK and USA including the National Portrait Gallery London, the Royal Academy and Manchester United Stadium Gallery. A prize-winner three times for her paintings at the Williamson Art Gallery in Birkenhead, she has also been featured in Cheshire Life Magazine and the Manchester Evening News. Her work is in the permanent collection of The Victoria and Albert Museum, National Art Library, Stockport Art Gallery and many private collections.

Jackie says “The rich light and colour of the shore changing with the time of day and weather influence my palette and the construction of space. My paintings, drawings and hand printed linocuts use glimpsed shafts of light, dazzling whites and bright colour contrasts from passing clouds. These colour imagery of boats, seagulls, window views and representations of my home town, evoking emotions and memories of journeys to and from the seaside.”

Carol Miller graduated from Hull College of Art in 1983, after specialising in illustration. Now concentrating on oil painting, she describes herself as “quietly passionate, obsessive and a perfectionist about my work.” She regularly exhibits throughout the North of England, where she has gained several awards and accolades; most recently winning the Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival 2013. She has paintings in private collections in the UK and USA. Her evocative and dramatic landscapes, always devoid of people, are not as benign as they first appear:

Carol says: “I use imagined landscapes to explore the imminent impact of unexpected events, loss and grief. The representational nature of my work produces private, unsettling, claustrophobic worlds, which aims to encourage the viewers subconscious memories. Whilst all the landscapes in my paintings are influenced by the local landscape, they are not literal interpretations but are derived from my perception, understanding and memories of places I have visited, the world I inhabit, it’s beauty, enormity, rhythms and unpredictability.”

All work is for sale.

The Reader Gallery, Calderstones Park, Liverpool

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