Tate Liverpool Awarded Freedom of the City


So now Liverpool Town Hall has a copy of this new work by Sir Peter Blake and Tate Liverpool has the right to herd their sheep along Dale street.

TATE Liverpool has been given the Freedom of the City in recognition of its two decades as a major cultural presence in the city.

The high-profile art gallery, which opened at the Albert Dock in 1988, has given Liverpool people some of the very best displays from the national collection.

It is an integral part of the artistic and cultural life of the city – and is the most visited modern and contemporary art gallery outside London.

Since it opened it has hosted more than 150 exhibitions, and in 2008 was responsible for one of the highlights of Liverpool’s Capital of Culture year when it displayed the work of Gustav Klimt. It is currently showcasing the work of Picasso in Picasso: Peace and Freedom.

Artist and long-serving Tate Liverpool supporter Sir Peter Blake has created a new artwork as a gift to the city in recognition of Tate Liverpool’s Freedom award.

Liverpool’s Lord Mayor Councillor Hazel Williams said: “Tate Liverpool has been an outstanding success and is now a fully established major cultural institution.

“I personally enjoy visiting its thought-provoking and high quality exhibitions and it is wonderful to have such an internationally renowned gallery on our doorstep.”

Tate Liverpool Director Christoph Grunenberg said: “We are delighted that Tate Liverpool has been admitted to the Freedom Roll of the City. Tate is enormously grateful to the city and the local people who have supported Tate Liverpool since its inception in 1988.”

Executive Director Andrea Nixon continued: “We look forward to our continued work with the city and our local communities: attracting more visitors to the city, expanding on the 60,000 local school and community participants we engage with each year, and allowing as many people as possible to enjoy an exciting range of special exhibitions and Tate collection displays.”