Royal Liver Atrium – ‘New Middle Kingdom’

image New Middle Kingdom Exhibition in the atrium of the Royal Liver Building
June 11 to July 4 2008

Featuring works from the Red Mansion Foundation Collection and including exhibits created by photographer Liu Bolin, curated by Anthony Francis.

 

in the Atrium of the:
Royal Liver Building
Pier Head
Liverpool L3 1NY

Opening Times
Tuesday to Friday 10.00am – 7.00pm
Saturday 10.00am – 4.00pm
Access to the general public is via the Royal Liver Assurance Entrance also known as the West Entrance (facing the riverside)

Also at Lakeside Arts Centre Nottingham
9 August – 21 September 2008
www.lakesidearts.org.uk

New Middle Kingdom Dialogues in Contemporary Chinese Art, brings to Liverpool current and significant new work from China, a country in the midst of a storm of global attention and anticipation. It is apparent that the country’s transition is providing the framework for a complex synthesis between Artist and Environment. On the fringe of change, a community of artists is adapting to new expectations and a re-structuring of the social fabric, which until recently has remained unexposed and unchanged, in one of the world’s oldest civilizations.

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‘New Middle Kingdom’ focuses upon those artists who are making sensitive work concerning the dialogue between rapid change and sense of identity. The intense international spotlight and the resulting burgeoning art market interest, has created a penumbra within which the ‘New’ can thrive: a natural habitat where this group of artists can contemplate individuality but also engage in cultural dialogues with society, to open perspectives and debate this new, cultural revolution. Indeed this dialogue has dynamic global relevance, being a product of the growing symbiotic relationship between East and West.

Liu Bolin – the artist in residence at the Exhibition was born in Shandong Province in 1973 and received a BA from Shandong ArtCollege in 1995 and a M.F.A. from Central Academy of Fine Arts. He is currently based in Beijing. By painstakingly painting himself or other subjects to blend into a variety of backgrounds, he inverts the background-foreground relations of conventional pictorial images. By making the subject blend into the background, he comments on the ways in which the contexts in which we live shape who we are.

The Red Mansion Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation, which promotes artistic exchange between China and Great Britain through exhibitions, exchange programmes, publications and the Red Mansion Art Prize. It houses the best of Chinese visual art within a 4,500 sq ft space in its gallery at 46 Portland Place London www.redmansion.co.uk

Sponsored by Tilney Private Wealth Management – Deutsche Bank and Royal Liver Assurance

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