Holocaust Artwork – Donate your Glasses

Via Liverpool Echo

Yoko Ono‘s glasses go to holocaust show

YOKO Ono has donated a pair of her own glasses to a Liverpool exhibition to raise awareness of the Holocaust.

The artist and widow of murdered Beatle John Lennon has also given a £10,000 gift towards the staging of a number of events surrounding National Holocaust Memorial Day next month.

Liverpool is hosting the national commemoration in 2008, culminating in a major event at the Philharmonic Hall on January 27.

Yoko Ono said: “It is an honour to be part of such a symbolic piece of artwork which will help people to learn how important it is never to forget the horrors of the Holocaust and to challenge hatred and prejudice wherever it arises.

“That is why I am supporting this project and I’m very pleased and very proud that Liverpool is the focal point for National Holocaust Memorial Day.”

Yoko’s glasses will form part of the RESPECtacles display at the Town Hall.

Merseyside comedian, actor and chat show host Paul O’Grady, comedian Ronnie Corbett, Stephen Fry and Jerry Springer have also donated their own glasses to the initiative.

Organisers hope thousands of people will join Yoko Ono and other celebrity donors and hand over unwanted spectacles to the display.

It will mirror one of the poignant collections of personal belongings on show at the Nazi death camp Auschwitz.

The project’s message is that everyone, particularly young people, can play their part in genocide prevention simply by having, showing and insisting on respect for other human beings and for their differences.

Liverpool Lord Mayor Paul Clark said: “We want people across the city to remember how important it is to never forget the horrors of the Holocaust and to challenge hatred and prejudice wherever it arises.

“This initiative is an opportunity for people in the city to be able to reflect on the past and the vital issues of today such as racism, prejudice, violence and bullying, but at the same time contribute to a major work of art and help visually impaired people in the developing world.