Open Eye: Zanele Muholi: Visual Activism / Bathini III

    Amanda Mahlaba Mt. Moriah Edgecombe Durban 2012 © Zanele Muholi. Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York
    Location (with MAP): Open Eye Gallery
    Date/Time: Tuesday 15 September 2015. 18:00 - 20:00
    Event: Talk - Open Eye: Zanele Muholi: Visual Activism / Bathini III
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    Artist Talk: Tuesday 15 September 2015 / 18.00 – 20.00

    The event is free however booking is required.
    To reserve your place please ring +44 (0)151 236 6768 or email info@openeye.org.uk

    The exhibition – Zanele Muholi: VUKANI/RISE opens on Friday 18 September 2015 (PV on Thurs 17th)

    Zanele Muholi is a South African photographer and visual activist whose work explores gender, race and sexuality, particularly in relation to South African society and political landscape.

    Artist statement:

    On the 30th July 2015 Thabo Molefe (47) was sentenced to 22 years in jail for raping and murdering a lesbian, Lihle Sokhela (28), in 2014, Daveyton, Johannesburg, South Africa.

    Part of my talk will focus on experiences – traumas of documenting hate crimes as a visual activist. I will also talk about the importance of collaborations and collectivism as most of the work that I do is done with participants in my projects and members of Inkanyiso.

    Over the past 10 years I have witnessed crime scenes of lesbian murders and attended funerals to document the realities of pain and loss. The presentation will feature visual works from various related events that impact on the lives of black South African lesbians, including how dead bodies are discarded and how those who survive are left disfigured.

    In Faces and Phases, photos and quotes from participants are showcased as a way in which we advocate for visibility, resistance and agency, and aims to foster a dialogue informed by the reality of our existence as we continue to experience our lives as citizens of SA, discouraged from living openly, fearing for our safety.

    Bathini is a Zulu expression meaning ‘What are they saying?’ which is a question never asked when a black lesbian is ‘curatively’ raped and murdered.

    The making of Faces and Phases will also form part of my presentation.